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Can Open Access Invert the Publishing Iceberg? Can Open Access Invert the Publishing Iceberg? 1/13/2019

Topic Open Access and Librarians

Preferred session type

1)    Presentations (45 minutes with additional 10 minutes for questions);

2)    Interactive panel discussions (60 minutes);

3)    Lightning talks (10 minutes);

Cora Cole MSC. CEO of GreyLit

Cora@greylit.net

GreyLit is What Lies below the surface- How Open Access Can Invert the Iceberg?

For many the tip of the information iceberg is often only what gets published in academic journals. This belief and practice leaves a vast amount of research and information sitting below the surface on shared drives or industry specific websites.  Librarians know there is a world of information below the surface of academia-the world of grey literature that holds equally insightful and valuable clues that impact patients, programs and policies. Librarians, and producers of grey literature know that if it could be accessed consistently it would, in fact, change the way research is published and information is shared.  This begs the question; could open access invert the publishing iceberg by bringing insightful grey literature to the surface where it can be found quickly and consistently?  

This presentation will talk about the global movement toward open access and will enlighten participants with the latest news and debates regarding open access including Plan S, and the University of California vs Elsevier and how one advocate and supporter of information access sees a new role and skill set for librarians and online libraries in the world of open access.

2017 LEA Report 2017 LEA Report 12/18/2018
Which maltreated children are at greatest risk of aggressive and criminal behavior? An examination of maltreatment dimensions and cumulative risk Which maltreated children are at greatest risk of aggressive and criminal behavior? An examination of maltreatment dimensions and cumulative risk 11/18/2018
This paper explores the well-documented relationship between child maltreatment and aggressive and criminal behavior, specifically examining several dimensions of maltreatment and cumulative child and family risk. Using data from the provincially representative Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (OIS-2013), this paper utilizes a developmental lens to examine whether maltreatment dimensions and cumulative risk can differentiate maltreated young people who exhibit aggressive and criminal behaviors and those who do not.A total unweighted sample of 1837 substantiated maltreatment investigations was examined in this analysis using chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression. The findings indicate that 13% of maltreated children and youth served by the Ontario child welfare system exhibited aggression and 6% of maltreated adolescents were involved in the youth justice system. Aggressive children and youth were more likely to experience severe and co-occurring forms of maltreatment and to experience higher levels of cumulative child risk. In adolescence, youth exhibiting aggressive and/or criminal behavior commonly were investigated because of neglect, specifically because their caregivers were no longer willing or able to remain in a caregiving role. Implications for child welfare policy and practice are discussed.
Correlates of admitted sexual interest in children among individuals convicted of child pornography offenses Correlates of admitted sexual interest in children among individuals convicted of child pornography offenses 11/18/2018
Recent research on a risk assessment tool for child pornography offending suggests that admission of sexual interest in children is a risk factor for any sexual recidivism. Admission is easily vulnerable to lying, however, or to refusals to respond when asked about sexual interests. This may become a particular issue when individuals are concerned about the potential impact of admission of sexual interest on sentencing and other risk-related decisions. In this study, we identified the following behavioral correlates (coded yes/no) of admission of sexual interest in children in the risk tool development sample of 286 men convicted of child pornography offenses: (a) never married (54% of sample), (b) child pornography content included child sexual abuse videos (64%), (c) child pornography content included sex stories involving children (31%), (d) evidence of interest in child pornography spanned 2 or more years (55%), (e) volunteered in a role with high access to children (7%), and (f) engaged in online sexual communication with a minor or officer posing as a minor (10%). When summed, the average score on this Correlates of Admission of Sexual Interest in Children (CASIC) measure was 2.21 (SD = 1.22, range 0-6) out of a possible 6, and the CASIC score was significantly associated with admission of sexual interest in children, area under the curve (AUC) = .71, 95% CI [ .65, .77]. The CASIC had a stronger relationship with admission in a small cross-validation sample of 60 child pornography offenders, AUC = .81, 95% CI [.68, .95]. CASIC scores may substitute for admission of sexual interest in risk assessment involving those with child pornography offenses. 
The journey of obtaining services: The realities of male survivors of childhood sexual abuse The journey of obtaining services: The realities of male survivors of childhood sexual abuse 11/18/2018
This article explores the journey of obtaining services for adult male survivors of child sexual abuse (CSA). Social norms and stereotypes regarding masculinity and male victimization weigh heavily on service use and on the accessibility of CSA services. Telephone interviews conducted with 17 adult male survivors of CSA were analyzed using a combination of phenomenological and interpretive description methods. Two main themes emerged from the data. The first theme, related to the experiences of obtaining services for their CSA history, explores the factors that motivated them to seek help, and their level of satisfaction with the services received. The second theme involved the challenges faced to obtain these services, including the length of time they had to wait, issues with trusting the wider system, and the difficulty finding services for men. Although different pathways exist to obtain services, the support received was generally found to be quite helpful. The resilience of the participants was noted in their capacity to seek services despite the many challenges they faced. The results suggest that changes must be undertaken at a policy level to reflect the reality and needs of male CSA survivors, and to increase their social recognition.
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